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Around the World – and Back Again

September 7, 2012

Seafood is global: as a food, a heritage, a livelihood, and a symbol of our shared waters around the world. Through our Global Spotlight Series, we’ve used the blog to share the stories behind our products: from facts about the species and their habitats to insight into the culture and history of the people who catch and prepare them.

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We believe it’s important to know where your food comes from. Over the last two years, the Global Spotlight Series has taken us on a journey:

It’s been quite the journey, and we’ve enjoyed sharing with you the relationships and hard work with our suppliers on the ground for each of these carefully-selected, carefully-prepared (quite often by hand) seafood products.

Last Leg of the Journey

To conclude the Global Spotlight Series, we visit Thailand:

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This nation of nearly 70 million people is located in Southeast Asia, in the middle of what’s known as the Indochina peninsula, separating the Bay of Bengal from the South China Sea, with the Gulf of Thailand right in the middle.

Known for its gorgeous waterways and greenery, or its grand palaces and Buddhist temples, Thailand is a popular destination for Western tourists. And it’s also the source of several of our products: crabs, clams, sardines, shrimp, and tuna.

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As that product list and Thailand’s geography suggest, seafood is an important part of Thailand’s culture and economy. 

Seafood and rice are Thailand’s two most plentiful exports. And culturally, both are quite popular. When Thai families dine out, it is very common for 2-3 seafood dishes to be ordered per meal.

For this last portion of our Global Spotlight Series, we will be focusing on a subset of the products we receive from Thailand: clams, crabs, and tuna.

Stay tuned for more about these amazing foods, sourced fresh and direct from our colleagues on the ground in Thailand, as our Global Spotlight Series continues.

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